Interviews and Media

Interviews/Guest Blogs

Interview on LauraMorningstar.com concerning Ten Thousand Thunders

Interview on The Tattooed Book Geek about Ten Thousand Thunders

Interview on PaulSemel.com

Interview on Fantasy & Science Fiction on “The Memorybox Vultures”

Guest post on the Analog blog concerning the composition of “An Incident on Ishtar”

Interview by Steven R. Southard of Poseidon’s Scribe on “Enchantment Lost”

Interview on Fantasy & Science Fiction on “A Thousand Deaths Through Flesh and Stone”

Interview on Fantasy & Science Fiction on “Last of the Sharkspeakers”

Interview with Third Flatiron on “The JPEG of Dorian Gray”

Reviews

For Ten Thousand Thunders

Ten Thousand Thunders is a thrilling science-fiction adventure from first page to last. Brian Trent is one of our very best new writers and now’s the time to start reading him.” (Robert J. Sawyer, Hugo Award-winning author of Flash Forward and Hominids)

Ten Thousand Thunders is a remarkable book, showcasing many of Brian Trent’s talents. He has created a believable and fascinating future, visited it with a plot any science fiction writer would be proud to have created, and — most important– populated it with believable, motivated characters. Hats off to the new kid on the science fiction block!” (Mike Resnick, 5-time Hugo winner)

“In Ten Thousand Thunders, Brian Trent layers dazzling future concepts upon Byzantine politics upon cinematic action to create a breathtaking work of science fiction.” (Marguerite Reed, author of Archangel)

Ten Thousand Thunders is a stunning science fiction book that takes place far into the future… an incredible inquiry and investigation into how the past impacts the future… the story was beautiful and terrifying and everything was seamlessly woven together.” (The Lily Café)

“I found Trent’s world building to be spot-on in this book and reading it was much akin to watching an engrossing science fiction film.  The book contains quite a bit of action and a fair amount of political intrigue – in a scientific manner.” (Booker T’s Farm)

“The story was like a beautifully woven sequence that played in my mind… A very detailed well written futuristic adventure that will suck you right in.” (Not Another Book Blogger)

TangentOnline

‘Shadows and Shore Leave’ by Brian Trent is a delightful tale about cloning and family dynamics, helped along with Trent’s witty and charming prose style and knack for dialogue… the reader will be left with a sense of ennui for the state of politics and its ability to rip up families. Fiction that makes the reader contemplate the state of the world is doing its job right, as it can expand our thinking.”

“‘Through the Eons Darkly’” is a dark time travel story, where Beatriz de Legarda is part of a project to travel back in time by entering the heads of people in the past… Brian Trent juggles several subplots along with the main one, plus some first-class characterization. The result is the type of chilling surprise that is a hallmark of all good science fiction.”

“A man sneaks into the land of the gods and steals a set of magic scrolls in Brian Trent’s fantasy story ‘The Scholar and the Books of Thoth.’ Djet, having been skillfully killed and revived by his slave Keket, comes back from the dead with tomes of ancient magic and skills, and promptly begins using his new magic to clear a path for himself to power and prestige… an interesting take on the Egyptian afterlife and a rather fun tale of divine justice.”

I, Arachnobot’ by Brian Trent tells the struggle of a robotic spider attempting to protect an old woman in a nursing home while under the compulsion of Asimov’s laws of robotics. The arachnobot’s wide interpretation of his conflicting programming is an entertaining logic puzzle that drives the plot while giving the arachnobot personality… a delightful tribute to Asimov.”

“Brian Trent leads off with ‘A Thousand Deaths Through Flesh and Stone’, a grim tale of revenge or justice, depending on one’s point of view… a fast-paced thriller with a level of violence which some readers may find disturbing.”

On “The JPEG of Dorian Gray”: “This story combines the classic gothic tale of Dorian Gray with the immortality of things posted on the internet, to great and humorous effect… The humor is well-paced, the prose flows between present and flashbacks easily, and the story overall is a well-crafted piece of dark humor and fantasy.”

‘Galleon’” by Brian Trent is an engaging story about what can happen to an AI over the millennia after interacting with countless humans, and then if left with too much time on its hands. The author provides more than a few twists and turns, making the ending a pleasant surprise.”

SF Crows Nest

“My favourite story was ‘Crash Site’ by Brian Trent, a hard SF novelette which forms a sequel to a story by Trent that appeared in F&SF exactly a year ago. Umerah Javed and Harris Alexander Pope are two agents for The Order Of Stone, the side which was victorious in a recent interstellar conflict. They’ve come to the planet Osiris to catch a geographer called Tel-Silag, who has become an unlikely murderer, gunning down a local hoodlum and his bodyguards in cold blood. However, they’re less interested in why he did it and more in the weapon he used, a piece of unusual alien tech that could be of great interest to those opposed to the dominance of The Order Of Stone. It’s no surprise to find, therefore, that others are after Tel-Silag, too. Who will get to him first? I enjoyed this story for the vividness of the world-building, particularly of the technologies, the aliens and the planet Osiris itself. Trent’s manipulation of parallel storylines and the skillful way in which he makes them gradually converge also made this piece stand out from the crowd. I would be very happy to read more tales set in this story universe in future.”

“My favourite story in this issue was the next novelette, Brian Trent’s ‘Last Of The Sharkspeakers’. This is a far future SF tale set inside the hollowed-out asteroid Ceres, where ‘normal’ humans co-exist rather uncomfortably with post-human scavengers who have evolved over hundreds of generations of living in low gravity in caves near the spinning asteroid’s poles. When three of these so-called ‘beltbugs’ hack into one of the dominant humans’ ‘voidsharks’, living spaceships controlled by electronic implants, they are captured and offered a deal. If they use their hacking skills to help the humans defeat the voidsharks of their mortal enemies, the Icari, they will be given enough food and medicines to solve all their tribe’s problems. Is this an offer that’s too good to be true? Trent has produced an exceptional story here, mixing fascinating speculations about the possible evolution of human bodies, societies and religions if we start living elsewhere in the solar system with an emotionally rich cast of characters set into conflict with one another. I thoroughly enjoyed it.”

“Turning to the seven short stories, Brian Trent’s ‘A Thousand Deaths Through Flesh And Stone’ is a military SF story set in our Solar system in the immediate aftermath of a terrible war. Harris Alexander Pope is a soldier-cum-spy who is looking forward to finally catching up with his brother during some long overdue shore leave. However, just before that happens, he gets dragged into one more mission. Will there ever be an escape from killing for Harris? This is a strong hard SF story packed full of interesting ideas, great action sequences and a protagonist who elicits great sympathy.”

SFRevu

“The fiction in the issue starts with “The Memorybox Vultures” by Brian Trent. Donna Lane works for Epitaph Incorporated, which takes care of “quasints”, recorded personalities of dead people. One of her clients is the dead Brent McCue who owned a brick-and-mortar bookstore when he was alive. Her job for McCue is a lot more complicated than it appeared at first. And there are a lot more quasints that Donna must deal with. Interesting idea. Perfectly handled.”

FantasyLiterature.com

‘Steel Dragons of a Luminous Sky’” by Brian Trent transported me back to the 1940s and ’50s and books like Doc Savage, Man of Bronze. Li Yan is an agent of China’s super-secret Luminous Sky, an organization dedicated to protecting the nation, which is currently torn by civil war and facing an external threat as Japan, with its giant robots, attacks its borders. Li has plenty of fancy gadgets himself, and when he and his American pilot buddy, Eva (a Flying Tiger), discover a secretive Chinese girl named Xin in the aftermath of a battle, the three of them decide to take on Japan’s flying fortress, Castle Tengu, and destroy the transmitter that controls the robots. Eva is a tough, wise-cracking sidekick and mysterious Xin is no slouch herself. The story is all action, vivid, colorful descriptions, reversals, lies, fun gizmos… and did I mention action? It’s a gallop of a story.”

‘Distant Gates of Eden Gleam’” by Brian Trent features James Porlock as a man new to an unusual job. He is to do whatever his boss, Lothian, tells him to do, using as references the Handbook for the New Illuminary, An Atlas of the World’s Fourteen Continents, and a thesaurus… ultimately, Porlock makes some controversial decisions about how to do his job, which is where everything we’ve been told comes together in a climax that had me grinning ear to ear. There’s some very fine plotting going on here, with all the clues we need to figure out what Porlock is going to do scattered throughout.”

Kirkus Reviews

On Time Travel Short Stories anthology: “Revel to Brian Trent’s ‘Omnipunks,’ a whip-smart mashup of cyberpunk, steampunk and alien invasion (and, yes, time travel).”